Birding Blog Archives

Fatbirder's Top 1000 Birding Websites
June 18th, 2016
Tags: , , , , , , ,

Aliso Spring, Paton Center, Patagonia Roadside Rest, Patagonia Lake

  • Click on the photos to view larger versions and watch as a slideshow
  • Hover over the photos to see the species name or site description

Despite the ferocious heat, we managed to find our main target bird and had a very productive day, with 87 species in total.

Gardner Canyon Rd:

Along the road we found GREATER ROADRUNNER, ASH-THROATED FLYCATCHER, CANYON TOWHEE, BOTTERI’S SPARROW, BLUE GROSBEAK, and ‘LILIAN’S’ EASTERN MEADOWLARK.

Aliso Spring:

The PINE FLYCATCHER continues, despite a large group of campers and birders.

Pine Flycatcher

Pine Flycatcher

Pine Flycatcher

Pine Flycatcher

Pine Flycatcher

Pine Flycatcher

Pine Flycatcher

Pine Flycatcher

Also in the area, a couple of female BLACK-CHINNED HUMMINGBIRDS on nests, ARIZONA WOODPECKER, DUSKY-CAPPED and SULPHUR-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS, HUTTON’S VIREO, ‘BROWN-THROATED’ HOUSE WREN, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, PAINTED REDSTART, SPOTTED TOWHEE, and BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK.

Black-chinned Hummingbird

Dusky-capped Flycatcher

As we left, we saw a pair of MONTEZUMA QUAIL and heard another calling nearby.

Gardner Canyon:

We continued to the end of the road and birded up canyon for a while, finding GRAY HAWK nest, two YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOOS, MAGNIFICENT HUMMINGBIRD, DUSKY-CAPPED and SULPHUR-BELLIED FLYCATCHERS, HUTTON’S VIREO, BLUE-GRAY GNATCATCHER, BLACK-THROATED GRAY WARBLER, PAINTED REDSTART, HEPATIC TANAGER, BLACK-HEADED GROSBEAK, and SCOTT’S ORIOLE.

White-tailed Deer

Tucson Audubon’s Paton Center, Patagonia:

A couple of VIOLET-CROWNED HUMMINGBIRDS were coming in, using at least three different feeders: feeder D, feeder 8, and the feeder near the new pond.

Violet-crowned Hummingbird

Violet-crowned Hummingbird

It was good to see another YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO. Sadly, the western subspecies is now on the endangered list, with SE Arizona being the last stronghold for this splendid bird.

Yellow-billed Cuckoo

The center was very birdy, despite the high temperatures. Highlights included GRAY HAWK, BLACK-CHINNED and BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRD, INCA DOVE, COMMON GROUND-DOVE, DUSKY-CAPPED and BROWN-CRESTED FLYCATCHERS, ABERT’S TOWHEE, SONG SPARROW, and BLACK-HEADED and BLUE GROSBEAKS.

Gambel's Quail

Inca Dove

Summer Tanager

Blue Haven Rd:

A ZONE-TAILED HAWK was present in the usual area, and we even managed to find the nest, which requires viewing from exactly the right angle.

Zone-tailed Hawk on nest

Several pairs of GREAT BLUE HERONS are also on nests, and we also saw LARK SPARROW, and BLACK-HEADED and BLUE GROSBEAKS.

Patagonia Roadside Rest:

All was silent mid-afternoon, but after a while we heard a THICK-BILLED KINGBIRD which called as it flew from the nest tree and crossed the road. We went to investigate and found it feeding on Mexican Elderberries.

Thick-billed Kingbird

Thick-billed Kingbird

Patagonia Lake:

I was surprised to see as many birds as we did, given the heat. The highlights were ‘MEXICAN’ MALLARD, PIED-BILLED GREBE, NEOTROPIC CORMORANT, SNOWY EGRET, GREEN HERON, BLACK VULTURE, YELLOW-BILLED CUCKOO, BLACK-TAILED GNATCATCHER, absolutely loads of LUCY’S WARBLERS, COMMON YELLOWTHROAT, YELLOW WARBLER, YELLOW-BREASTED CHAT, RUFOUS-WINGED and BLACK-THROATED SPARROWS, SUMMER TANAGER, and BLACK-HEADED and BLUE GROSBEAKS.

Summer Tanager

Vermilion Flycatcher

Queen

Queen

Velvet Ant

Elegant Earless Lizard

Elegant Earless Lizard

Woodhouse's Toad

Woodhouse's Toad

Nogales:

A colony of ‘MEXICAN’ CLIFF SWALLOWS has sprung up around the Candelwood Suites hotel and nearby buildings, and the first juveniles have just left the nest.

'Mexican' Cliff Swallow

'Mexican' Cliff Swallow

'Mexican' Cliff Swallow

 

6 comments to Aliso Spring, Paton Center, Patagonia Roadside Rest, Patagonia Lake

  • Debra Haber

    Richard,
    I love reading your posts and looking at your photos. I recently had an yellow-billed cuckoo on my property near the San Pedro River south of Benson off highway 80. I did not realize they are on the endangered list or that it is a Western subspecies. Thank you for the additional information. Hope to see you at Southwest Wings and then in the fall for a day out birding.

    • Richard

      Thanks Debra!

      It’s just the western subspecies of Yellow-billed Cuckoo that is endangered, they seem to be doing fine out east. We’re lucky to still have them in SE Arizona, and you’re very lucky to get one in your yard! There are about 250 pairs of the western subspecies left. They used to be across the west, but have completely disappeared from Washington and Oregon, and only a few remain in California, with the rest in AZ.

      See you at SW Wings!

  • Hi Richard,

    Thanks for the great pictures. I really like that you include critters other than birds. I think we birders sometimes forget to look for the other wildlife that’s out there. I know I need to pay more attention to it myself.

  • Betty

    Richard,

    I love reading your blog. And I also really enjoy your pictures of the “critters”. I live in Texas, so I don’t know all of the Arizona critters. Your photography of both birds and other animals is great. I look forward to reading each of your posts.

Leave a Reply

You can use these HTML tags

<a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>