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October 29th, 2014
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Sinaloa Wren, Black-capped Gnatcatchers

A very pleasant day of birding in the Santa Rita Mountains and Santa Cruz Valley, with 77 species in total. I had the camera on the wrong settings all day, hence the crappy photos!

Green Valley:
GILDED FLICKER at the southern end of S La Canada Dr. A few WHITE-WINGED DOVES still around.

Florida Canyon:
Three BLACK-CAPPED GNATCATCHERS, a pair by the 481/62A intersection (with a BLACK-TAILED GNATCATCHER), and another by the parking area.
A real surprise, a GILDED FLICKER well out of its usual habitat.
A juvenile NORTHERN BEARDLESS-TYRANNULET was by the parking area.
Another lowland RED-BREASTED NUTHATCH, this one in a large oak just up canyon from the parking area.
A pair of GOLDEN EAGLES low over the hills, and then a real treat as we left, when one of the eagles appeared low over the 481/62A intersection giving close flight views, with an attending Red-tailed Hawk and Northern Harrier.
Also, WHITE-WINGED DOVE, GRAY FLYCATCHER, CASSIN’S KINGBIRD, TOWNSEND’S and WILSON’S WARBLERS, a couple of PAINTED REDSTARTS, and RUFOUS-WINGED SPARROW.

Black-capped Gnatcatcher

Golden Eagle and Red-tailed Hawk

Golden Eagle

Green-tailed Towhee

Northern Beardless-Tyrannulet

Madera Canyon:
Interestingly, an INCA DOVE, rare in this habitat, was around the feeders at Santa Rita Lodge, perhaps the same one that was at Madera Kubo Cabins earlier in the year.
Also at Santa Rita Lodge, WHITE-WINGED DOVE, ANNA’S and BROAD-BILLED HUMMINGBIRDS, ARIZONA WOODPECKER, HEPATIC TANAGER, and PINE SISKIN. Multiple MAGNIFICENT HUMMINGBIRDS were at Madera Kubo Cabins. Thanks to both lodges for their generous bird feeding.

Inca Dove

Amado Pond:
Two BLACK-BELLIED WHISTLING-DUCKS, an EARED GREBE, and a couple of BROWN-HEADED and 10+ BRONZED COWBIRDS with a flock of GREAT-TAILED GRACKLES and YELLOW-HEADED BLACKBIRDS.

Tubac:
The SINALOA WREN was surprisingly cooperative around 2:00 pm, giving a loud burst of song a couple of minutes after we arrived, then showing in almost constant view for about 30 seconds before diving back into its favorite tangle. This was at the regular site, the power line cut along the De Anza Trail, 0.8 miles south of the bridge at Bridge Rd. A WILSON’S WARBLER was also found in our very brief visit.

Sinaloa Wren

 

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